Fruit Of The Week MANDARIN ORANGE


mandarin

The Mandarin orange, also known as mandarin or mandarine, is a small citrus tree (Citrus reticulata) with fruit resembling the orange. The fruit is oblate, rather than spherical. Mandarin oranges are usually eaten plain, or in fruit salads. Specifically reddish orange mandarin cultivars can be marketed as tangerines, but this is not a botanical classification.

The tree is more drought tolerant than the fruit. The mandarin is tender, and is damaged easily by cold. It can be grown in tropical and subtropical areas.

Varieties And Characteristics

The Mandarin orange is but one variety of the orange family. The mandarin has many names, some of which actually refer to crosses between the mandarin and another citrus fruit. Most canned mandarins are of the Mikan variety (derived from migan in Chinese), of which there are over 200 cultivars. One of the more well-known mikan cultivars is the “Owari”, which ripens during the late fall season in the Northern Hemisphere. Clementines, however, have displaced mikans in many markets, and are becoming the most important commercial mandarin variety.

The mandarin is easily peeled with the fingers, starting at the thick rind covering the depression at the top of the fruit, and can be easily split into even segments without squirting juice. This makes it convenient to eat, as utensils are not required to peel or cut the fruit.

The tangor, which is also called the temple orange, is a cross between the mandarin and the common orange. Its thick rind is easy to peel; and its bright orange pulp is sweet, full-flavored, and tart.

Biological characteristics

Citrus fruits varieties are usually self-fertile (needing a bee only to move pollen within the same flower) or parthenocarpic (not needing pollination and therefore seedless) (such as satsumas).

Blossoms from the Dancy cultivar are one exception. They are self sterile, therefore must have a pollenizer variety to supply pollen, and a high bee population to make a good crop.

Furthermore, some varieties, notably clementines, are usually seed free, but will develop seeds if cross-pollinated with a seeded citrus. Thus, great efforts are taken to isolate clementine orchards from any seeded citrus varieties.

Medicinal Use

-The dried peel of the fruit of C. reticulata is used in the regulation of ch’i in Traditional Chinese medicine

-The peel is also used to treat abdominal distention, enhance digestion, and to reduce phlegm.

Processing

Canned mandarin segments are peeled to remove the white pith prior to canning; otherwise, they turn bitter. Segments are peeled using a chemical process. First, the segments are scalded in hot water to loosen the skin; then they are bathed in a lye solution which digests the albedo and membranes. Finally, the segments undergo several rinses in plain water.

Recipes

You can Find number of recipes containing oranges in Ayesha’s Kitchen:

Flu Fighter

About these ads

6 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Breakfast Fruit Salad « Ayesha's Kitchen
  2. Trackback: История мандарина | Поэзия Ароматов
  3. lova
    Jan 05, 2011 @ 05:03:13

    in my country those are called portugals..i’m from trinidad

    Reply

  4. eyelash growth enhancer
    Aug 10, 2013 @ 01:11:07

    This design is wicked! You definitely know how to keep a reader
    entertained. Between your wit and your videos, I was almost moved to start my own blog (well, almost…HaHa!) Fantastic
    job. I really enjoyed what you had to say, and more than that, how you presented it.
    Too cool!

    Reply

  5. how Describe
    Sep 03, 2013 @ 13:50:31

    I like the helpful info you provide in your articles.

    I’ll bookmark your blog and check again here frequently.
    I am quite sure I’ll learn lots of new stuff right here!

    Best of luck for the next!

    Reply

  6. dina
    Feb 26, 2014 @ 23:46:09

    I like ur recipes !

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,554 other followers

%d bloggers like this: